W. Virginia Congress clerks try to block police officer’s expungment

West Virginia University graduate and police officer Aaron Vanatta is seeking expungment of a pardon for minor offenses he committed during his college days.  Vanatta plead guilty to the charges in 1994 and received a pardon for them in 2005 by Judge Russel M. Clawges and Gov. Bob Wise.

Now, in order to prevent the charges from harming his career in law enforcement, Vanatta hopes to have all records of the crimes and pardon expunged.  However, a Senate  clerk and  House clerk are petitioning the Supreme Court to stop him from having the past crimes and pardon expunged.  Darrell Holmes and Greg Gray argue that state law does not allow for Vanatta’s records and pardon to be expunged because according to a 2009 law, the records of state legislature, secretary of state, and governor are not subject to the Supreme Court’s expungment order.  Vanatta’s lawyer believes that the law does not apply to his case.

If you or someone you know is considering requesting expungement, contact the Dallas expungement lawyer Mark T. Lassiter at 214-651-1121 to learn more about your rights.

East Texas man seeks expungement for wrongful termination

A former field technician working for Landtel Communications and Rignet has filed a wrongful termination lawsuit against his former employer for allegedly firing him for asking for workers’ compensation.

Donnie Nash was injured while driving a company vehicle back to their Texas facility from one in Louisiana.  When Nash went to his supervisor to request reimbursement for the medical expenses related to his injuries from the accident he was not given the requested workers’ compensation, but was questioned about the route he took.  Three days later he was terminated from his position.

If you have been wrongfully terminated from a job you may be able to have this removed from your record in order to prevent it from harming your future job searches.  If you or someone you know is considering requesting expungement of their record, contact the Dallas expungement attorney Mark T. Lassiter at 214-651-1121 to learn more about your rights.

Ohio man fired for 40-year old expunged crime

Iverson Banks-Bey of Ohio was fired from his recently acquired job as a 9-1-1 emergency  dispatcher after his employers found out about a 40-year old crime he committed and had expunged.

When Banks-Bey was 20 years old attending Case Western Reserve University, a former roommate stole some personal items from him, including his late father’s coin collections.  He then went to the theif’s house with a gun and broke in.  Banks-Bey was charged and plead guilty to breaking and entering with intent to cause bodily harm.  Seven years later in 1977, he had this crime expunged from his record.

For 30 years, Banks-Bey worked for the City of Cleveland as a firefighter until he retired.  Recently, he decided to work again and was hired as a 9-1-1- dispatcher.  In less than a month of working as a dispatcher, Banks-Bey was fired after his employers discovered two previous felonies on his record from before the expungement.  If Banks-Bey had committed two crimes prior to the break in, expungement would not have been an option.  Banks-Bey stated, “I’m not the same hotheaded, temperamental reckless young man I was 40 years ago.  If expungement does not mean the record is wiped clean, I don’t think anyone can get a fair shake”.

If you or someone you know is considering requesting expungement, contact the Dallas expungement lawyers of The Law Offices of Mark T. Lassiter at 214-651-1121 to learn more about your rights.

Expungement in Texas

In Texas, expungement can be very helpful to people who have been arrested but found not guilty of the charges.  For people that have been found not guilty, if they do not have their record expunged the charges and arrest will remain on their record and can be harmful to their future in a variety of ways.

Texas laws also allow people convicted of Class C misdemeanors to expunge their record if they have received and completed deferred adjudication.

After an expungement suit, the release and distribution of expunged records by any agency is prohibited.  Furthermore, the person whose record is expunged is then allowed to deny the occurrence of the arrest and charges, even under oath.

If you or someone you know is seeking expungement, contact the Dallas expungement lawyers of The Law Offices of Mark T. Lassiter at 214-651-1121 to learn more about your rights.

Expungement for juveniles taking too long?

Families in Pennsylvania are struggling to find closure in getting their children’s and teens’ records expunged.  Families and kids in Luzerne County involved in the “cash for kids” scandal received a vow from the state Supreme Court to throw out the bribed judgments from former judges Mark Ciavarella Jr. and Michael Conahan.  However, the expungement process is taking much longer than they believe it should, in many cases hurting the teens’ futures.

The state Supreme Court asked a Berks County senior judge to review over 5,000 questionable juvenile cases to determine if expungement was necessary.  The director of Luzerne County probation services told the Philadelphia Inquirer this could take up to six years.

Meanwhile, the kids involved in the “cash for kids” scandal are having difficulty getting jobs or loans for college because of the criminal charges.  Also, for teens who have found themselves in trouble with the law again are receiving harsher punishment because of the previous convictions that are waiting to be expunged.

If you or someone you know needs their record expunged, contact the Dallas expungement lawyers of The Law Offices of Mark T. Lassiter at 214-651-1121 to learn more about your rights.

PA judge reverses decision to delete newspaper stories

In a recent expungement case in Pennsylvania, defendants awarded expungement of their record included a provision to the order that demanded two Pennsylvania newspapers delete stories about the crimes being expunged.  Lawyers argued that the media’s First Amendment rights were ultimately keeping the defendants’ records from being completely expunged.

After complaints by The Centre Daily Times and The Daily Collegian, Judge Bradley Lunsford reversed the decision and has allowed the newspapers to keep the stories for fear of violating First Amendment rights.

“What’s the sense of having your record expunged if any one can Google you and it comes up,” stated the defense’s attorney.

If you or someone you know is looking to have their record expunged, contact the Dallas expungement lawyers of The Law Offices of Mark T. Lassiter at 214-651-1121 to learn more about your rights.

Three-time Oklahoma City murder suspect requests expungement

A man charged with three counts of first-degree murder in Oklahoma City in 1996 is requesting expungement of the charges.  35-year old Demont Rogers faced trial in 1999 for the charges which were dropped, and he was instead charged with murder in connection to the shoot-out.  The trial ended quickly after a witness’ credibility was undermined by the presentation of previous allegations of sexual misconduct.  The trial was declared a mistrial and Rogers was unable to be tried again due to double jeopardy.

Now, Rogers is filing a petition for the expungement of his record.  He has trial set today in the Oklahoma City District Court.

Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater stated, “Frankly, I was surprised that the expungement was filed …  That’s unusual that you’ll ever have anyone file a motion for expungement on a case as serious as murder”.

If you or someone you know is considering filing a petition for expungement, contact the Dallas expungement attorneys of The Law Offices of Mark T. Lassiter at 214-651-1121 to learn more about your rights.

Rhode Island woman regains freedom after expungement

45-year old Felicia Delgado of Rhode Island celebrated this week after District Court Judge Elaine Bucci announced the expungement of previous prostitution convictions from her record.   The ruling is the first of its kind after a provision to the state of Rhode Island’s prostitution law that allows the expungement of an unlimited number of prostitution convictions from an individual’s record.

Despite objections from the attorney general, Judge Bucci agreed to expunge the five loitering for prostitution counts from 1999 to 2001 from Delgado’s records.   The attorney general expressed plans to appeal the decision.  If the decision is reversed, Delgado will still have shoplifting, check fraud, and drug possession charges expunged.

Delgado has most recently been working for a neighborhood organization devoted to helping women off the streets.

If you or someone you know has been charged with a crime and are looking to expunge your record, contact the Dallas expungement lawyers of the Law Offices of Mark T. Lassiter at 214-651-1121 to learn more about your rights.

Expungement Summit to take place in Cook County

The Cook County Circuit Court will hold an “Expungement Summit” in Blue Island at a local high school so that people can come expunge their records for a small court fee.

If a person does not qualify for expungement, they can seal their records permanently from the public. If neither expungement or permanent sealing work, they may go for the process to apply for clemency.

The attendance level at the event it expected to be between 3,000 and 4,000. Over 75 volunteers will be working to make this operation function smoothly. There will also be free shuttles that will be taking people to Blue Island. All of the five previous summits were held in Chicago, this will be the first to happen in the suburbs.

If you or a loved one are looking to expunge your record, contact the Dallas expungement lawyers of the law office of Mark T. Lassiter by calling 214-651-1121.

New federal expungement law sought

A U.S. representative from Tennessee is introducing a bill that will help nonviolent ex-convicts expunge their federal criminal records.

The bill was discussed in a subcommittee hearing where representative explained that there are many people who struggle to get jobs because of a previous felony.

The new bill will give ex-convicts the chance to apply to have their records expunged or removed by the court that convicted them. U.S. attorneys will be allowed to make recommendations for or against the applicants.The new bill would also allow a person to re-apply for expungement every two years.

If you or a loved one has been charged with a crime and it is inhibiting them from becoming employed, contact the Dallas expungement lawyers of Mark T. Lassiter by calling to discuss your legal options.

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